CEO Evan Spiegel explains why Snapchat’s new Memories feature is a terrible idea

For anyone who attended the mega advertising festival called Cannes Lions in 2015, they will no doubt recall that Snapchat seemed to be literally everywhere. The red-hot mobile app had burst into the mainstream, and the advertising community couldn’t get enough of it.
I was one of those attendees, and I happened to catch a visibly jet-lagged Evan Spiegel during his keynote interview on the main stage as he explained the history and vision of the company he had founded.
So many things about Snapchat seemed counterintuitive: It collected no data on users to target them with ads, for instance. But more importantly, its defining feature was its ephemeral nature.
You take a picture or video. You share it. It vanishes.
Spiegel said that day that saving tons of stuff was for old people and the social networks they favored, like Facebook (though he didn’t name them). Millennials had a different mindset, he added:

I’m not the first person to hate looking at myself seven years ago. A lot of [social networks] create your profile and at some point, as you are accumulating all this stuff, it’s not really you any more.

Apparently, that vision has proved to be as ephemeral as a typical snap on Snapchat. Because today, Snapchat announced “Memories,” a new feature that lets you save your snaps!
According to Snapchat’s blog post, this new feature is “a personal collection of your favorite moments that lives below the Camera screen.”
Now, don’t get me wrong. I’m a fan of this type of thing. At my advanced age of 113 years, one of my favorite things is Facebook’s “On This Day” feature, which dredges up my posts from that same day in the past. Seriously, seeing pictures of your kids when they were smiling, doting cherubs makes it a bit easier to get through the angst-ridden pre-pubescent days of their adolescence.
Also, I was thinner.
Of course, the timing of Snapchat’s new Memories features comes just as the Wall Street Journal noted in a recent story that old people like me are increasingly using it. And with our short, impaired memories, we need all the help we can get just to remember where we put our other sock.
Speaking of old things and memories, let’s make this all even worse. Here is “Memory” from Cats, because I feel like it:

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CEO Evan Spiegel explains why Snapchat’s new Memories feature is a terrible idea
CEO Evan Spiegel explains why Snapchat’s new Memories feature is a terrible idea



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